Tokyo: first days

Due to my laziness, there are still some posts missing for some cities, but I feel like writing about Japan now 🙂

I arrived two days ago to Tokyo. It’s almost my first time to Asia (being on the Asian part of Turkey for a couple of hours doesn’t really count), so I am still getting used to all the new things I find here.

On my first day, I went for a walk in Asakusa, the area where I’m staying. This is Kaminarimon, one of the gates to Senso-ji temple:

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The gardens surrounding the temple:

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And this is just a cute dog standing in front of a shop in a street nearby:

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And this is just a cute pig going for a walk:

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Then I went to Ueno park in the afternoon:
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I felt so relaxed there! I was just walking around randomly and there was something to take a picture of in every corner. Here I feel like the Japanese tourists in Europe who are always making pictures of every single thing they see.

Yesterday I went for a walk in the Imperial Palace East gardens, which is the only thing you can see from the Imperial Palace if you didn’t know that you have to book your tour some weeks in advance. Ouch!

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Everything is so clean and well taken care of that it looks like a movie set.

In the afternoon, I went to see the panoramic view from Bunkyo Civic Center. There are a lot of skyscrapers in Tokyo but I decided to go to this tower which offers you a view from just a 25th floor for two reasons: it’s free and, in a lucky day, you can see Mount Fuji from there. Look, here it is:

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Ehm… no, it wasn’t a lucky day, as you can guess, but in a day without fog it should be exactly there. As I have read, there are only a few days every month where Mount Fuji is visible, and on that days it should look like in the pictures here. I feel deceived. Japan, I want my money back!

Anyway, I liked the views. It’s shocking to see so many small buildings of just 2 or 3 floors so close to tall buildings, it seems like there is no homogeinity:

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If you look closely you will notice it: cars here drive on the left. Actually, when walking in the subway stations, you also have to keep always to the left, which is something I wasn’t used to.

Speaking of differences, another one: here the streets don’t have names, the home adresses just indicate the block number of the building. You can read the full explanation in Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_addressing_system. So when you are looking at a map from a Japanese city, you have to search for landmarks and try to guess the place where you want to go according to them. For a person like me who is used to check every street name in Google Maps in order to go from A to B, this is hell.

And finally I went to Shibuya in the evening. This place is full of lights, shops, fast food restaurants and young people. Some might recognize it from the film Lost in Translation and in my case, I couldn’t take this song out of my head when I was there:

Some pictures I took:

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It would look nicer without my finger on it, I know

There is also this big famous crossing that I can’t just explain with words:

People, people, people.

On my next posts I will write about the sumo combat I went to see today, the japanese toilets and being vegan in Japan. See you!

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